Sunday, November 23, 2014

Real World Applications of Video Game on a Personal Level

to expound on ways in which games assist people in unique, even secret ways, that give them a tangible benefit in the world.

I dropped out of the blog game because I felt it was mainly a masturbatory exercise to fill the vacuous lives of individuals largely ignorant of the real-world politik both inside the video games industry and relevant corporate sectors, who wished to exert some special influence on, perhaps, newcomers to the industry who have inherited a position in which they have some say over the design of these video games.  I'm sure many achieved this goal, and certainly envy them in many ways, but I must admit this wasn't the primary purpose, as understood by myself at the time.

Throughout my life I have found myself using a game dynamic as a metaphor in order to make some decision, or to make an objective assessment of something I or someone else has done in the past, or proposes to do.  I am wondering if I could start a discussion about that life strategy without divulging any actual examples, to concentrate on exactly what ways games have made themselves practical in everyday life, what kinds of games are most likely to be useful toward that end, and how we could exacerbate these effects both through game design and application of the strategy.

I am wondering if I could start a discussion about that life strategy without divulging any actual examples, to concentrate on exactly what ways games have made themselves practical in everyday life, what kinds of games are most likely to be useful toward that end, and how we could exacerbate these effects both through game design and application of the strategy.sic

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Background of Leaked Information

Over the course of the next year, I will be posting various design documentation, research essays, scratched-out brainstorming ideas, and other assorted artifacts related to my thoughts on games and their relationship with reality as pertains to major filters such as world governments, broadcast communication, reactionary commentary, and so on, as will be revealed in detail through the leaked information.

This has been in part a collaborative effort, and as those who helped me often did so unaware of the intended result of the input, I have been careful to select material in which I have solely created, however influenced I was by those who may be truly called the authors of the content (e.g., there may contain the transcripts of various poems, written not by myself, but transcribed by me as they were heard by me at the time).  With that in mind, please let me denigrate my own skill for the purposes of revealing deeper truths, in that while I do have practice in these various arts I engage in, I am no means a master at any, and I am aware of this.  However, see these materials (however "pretty" or "chaotic" they may be) as the hurried scratches of an artist imagining what will be, by necessity rough and sketchy, though apparently something that will help guide the artist toward that thing.

Interactive Illuminatus is a fundamentally democratic forum, though it has as of yet been monopolized by myself.  I had hoped from the beginning I would receive essays or thoughts to a great extent than I have thus far, and wish to extend this invitation again, encouraging the sharing of ideas in whatever way is easiest; also thanking those who have already contributed.

So in further aid of sparking the outpouring of new ideas, I introduce to you:
something

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Exploring ludodissonance

Readers of my previous post on ludonarrative dissonance may have noted that formal dissonance and moral/ethical dissonance didn't sound all that bad.  Defying genre expectations?  Putting two ethical systems into conflict?  It sounds more like art than bad game design, right?

To be quite clear, ludodissonance can be quite bad--bad meaning that it creates effects contrary to the desires of the game designer.  If the goal of the game designer is to make a serious game, but the mechanics of the game make the characters look ridiculous, the game designer has unequivocally failed.

However, "bad design" is not all ludodissonance has to offer.  Dissonance is a very useful tool in the creation of art, so I want to survey examples of dissonance outside games, within games, and then speculate on ways to think about ludodissonance going forward.

Friday, December 17, 2010

Schell School

To me, the most important part of the test is the final task: turning it in to the provost.  You have to look confident, almost dismissive, but not too much or they'll think you're fronting.  I don't know if they actually have a hidden score sheet somewhere grading my "attitude," but it's not really about the points at that moment.  It's a sense of propriety--an affirmation of what you are and what you stand for.  It's a test of who you are as a person: too arrogant and you're a bully; too timid and you're a coward, unfit for your position.

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

coupla links

This is why we make games.

And this is why we read the comments section.